Gossip: The Jelly Donut

Gossip: The Jelly Donut

There's a tongue-in-cheek Hallmark card that shows two women in a restaurant. One of them is beckoning to the other, saying, "If you don't have anything nice to say about anyone, come sit by me!" We chuckle because we all know how delicious and seductive gossip can be—as long as you are not bothered by that old "do unto others" rule.

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Rooftop Friends

Rooftop Friends

. . . I played this small part in a brigade her closer friends had organized to help her through the ordeal of treatments. They created a schedule of shifts members of the group took alternately, so she never had to go to those appointments alone. I was glad to have done it once, even if a few hours seemed like a single drop in a big bucket against what she endured the last years of her life. . .

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Small Kindnesses

Small Kindnesses

. . .When we’re confronted by a friend’s problems, we sometimes forget that our small kindnesses matter. One note, evening, dinner? It won’t make a difference, we say to ourselves. We’d do well to remember Hale’s line, because in the scheme of things, our seemingly insignificant deeds—the unplanned gestures and words—may matter most of all. Comfort matters. It lasts. . . 

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How to Help When a Friend is Grieving

How to Help When a Friend is Grieving

By Mary Cail
First published on mariashriver.com
2.8K Recommend This

. . . We’re less likely, perhaps, to be that dreaded fair-weather friend when grief is caused by an accident or a heart attack, or when it happens because of a disease that leaves intellect and personality intact until the end. Such a loss is easier to understand and imagine. There’s an almost tangible “before” and “after” line—before the car accident, after the cancer diagnosis—which we know to respect. . . 

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3 Ways to Help a Friend Through a Difficult Anniversary

3 Ways to Help a Friend Through a Difficult Anniversary

By Mary Cail
First published on mariashriver.com
550 Recommend This

. . . On Wayne’s birthday, the year he died, my friend Suzanne and I bought cupcakes and candles, and hiked to an outcropping of boulders in the Rockies. We found a crevice between two rocks, where we lit the candles, cupping our hands against the cold April wind. I couldn’t speak. Suzanne stood up, slight and small against the huge backdrop of open sky and valley. . .

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